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Patricia McBride-Still Living the Dancer’s Dream (Protege of George Balanchine)


Patricia McBride lived a dancer’s dream: Her mentor was George Balanchine

2   Patricia McBride and George Balanchine

Patricia McBride rehearsing with choreographer George Balanchine.

This was normal for McBride, then the New York City Ballet’s principal dancer (now the associate artistic director at the Charlotte Ballet), but working with Balanchine would have been a dream come true for aspiring ballerinas around the world.

He is known as an artistic genius in the ballet world. A gifted choreographer responsible for changing the face of dance and famous for the New York City Ballet’s ” Coppélia” and “The Nutcracker.” And this man personally invited McBride to join his company when she was just 16 years old.

Balanchine and McBride would work alone in a studio, not speaking much. Balanchine would cue the music and dance in front of McBride. A pianist himself, musicality was of the utmost importance to Balanchine. He wanted the dances to flow naturally, so he let the music do the speaking. McBride followed along behind him, learning the steps. Forty-five minutes later, McBride would have a new solo in her repertoire.

“He worked so quickly and he didn’t have to experiment with you. He knew exactly what you could do,” McBride said in a phone interview. “Once something was made to you, you had to remember it forever. You were the guardian of the choreography.”

Balanchine trained McBride for a 30-year career with the New York City Ballet. She danced over 100 ballets in that time, including 30 choreographed just for her. When she performed her final ballet in 1989, McBride was showered with 13,000 roses and a standing ovation.

But McBride did not leave dance behind. She went on to teach at Indiana University and then took over the Charlotte Ballet in North Carolina with her husband and dance partner, Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux in 1998. She’s now 72 and still teaches eight ballet classes at a time, on top of running rehearsals for performances like The Nutcracker.

This lifelong dedication to dance has been noticed by the outside world, too.

Earlier this month, McBride walked down a red carpet in Washington, D.C., to be honored for her commitment to the performing arts. She mingled with Tom Hanks and Sting, had dinner with John Kerry and met the Obamas. She was given a rainbow-colored Kennedy Center Honors ribbon and listened to actress Christine Baranski praise her accomplishments.

It was a celebratory weekend all about honoring the ballerina (among other honorees), but McBride was quick to thank others in our interview. Especially Balanchine, her mentor.

Theirs was an intimate setting to work in, but Balanchine was more than a teacher to McBride. She looked up to him as a role model and desperately wanted to please him. McBride‘s own father left her family when she was just 3 years old, so Balanchine stepped in to fill that role.

“I grew up without a father so he was everything to me — the man I most admired and just the most wonderful role model anyone could have,” McBride said.

And their relationship was not lost on the outside world.

“A true muse for George Balanchine, he created many ballets especially for her,” said Larry Attaway, executive director of ballet at Butler University. “She was one of the most remarkable ballerinas of the 20th century.”

McBride still remembers leaping for joy when Balanchine invited her to join the New York City Ballet Company all those years ago — and did not hesitate to give up a normal teenage life for one of endless rehearsals, travel and intense dedication.

Balanchine took McBride under his wing and trained her to dance his ballets, many of which are still performed around the world today. She traveled to Tokyo, Italy, Germany, London, Paris, South America and Russia to dance, including five performances for U.S. presidents. Leading roles in her repertoire include the Sugarplum Fairy in “The Nutcracker” and Colombine in ”Harlequinade.”

“I cherish the ballets made for myself by Mr. Balanchine,” McBride said in a phone interview. “He never lost his temper. He was quiet, humble, the genius of the 20th century. He changed the face of what dance is today.”

Balanchine was her teacher, her mentor and inspiration during her long-lived dancing career. He pushed her and drove her to perform at the highest possible level, but he was also kind and patient — a notable trait in the perfectionism-driven world of ballet.

“In the beginning, he taught you how to hold your fingers, use your head, hold your shoulders, how you glissade, bourre — the exact way he wanted you to do the steps,” McBride said. “It was relearning the whole Balanchine technique.”

He was not a man of many words, but when he did offer praise, it stayed with McBride for years to come.

“After performances he would say, ‘Good, good.’ He never really gave a harsh word. I don’t ever remember him saying, ‘That was awful,’ ever. He didn’t praise that much, but when he did, it was wonderful. He would say, ‘I loved how you used your eyes, you were mysterious.’ It would make you feel like a million dollars.”

Balanchine passed away in 1983, but McBride carries on his legacy by teaching her students his ballets with patience and kindness. She gives her students at the Charlotte Ballet Academy praise and talks highly of her “beautiful dancers.” She believes in nurturing her students and making them feel secure in themselves.

“Mr. Balanchine wanted me to be myself. He didn’t want me to look like anyone else,” McBride said. “I love teaching our company dancers the Balanchine ballets. I try to give them what was passed down to me and what I learned from him. They dance it so beautifully. It also keeps me close to Mr. Balanchine. He’s with me every single day.”

Looking For the Perfect Ballet Summer Intensive? A Visual Viewfinder for you….



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pinterest interest: summer intensives…….

Here is my profile

My new favorite pin appears in the right sidebar of the homepage….click on that image in future for updates information on Summer Intensives. Thank you.

TEXT MERGED FROM “LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT SUMMER INTENSIVE”

For the next bit of time, I will respond to many readers interests by comparing and contrasting unique, trendy, off-the-beaten path, professional and learned (as well as the visually stimulating) summer intensives that might otherwise be forgotten in the dancers mad rush to prepare portfolios, pictures, resumes and now dvds for the usual Summer Intensives. VISUALLY.

Where do I go??? (Should be one of the considerations for any dancer professional or not) And spend the least amount of money for the most improvement, fun and holiday? Dance can be fun. Should be. Must be.

Too often, it is the triad of schools for the American dancer (SAB, ABT, SFB). Internationally, but not international, we think of Paris, Kirov, Bolshoi, Royal, NYCB, which are not just a destination, but are also most frequently observed as a method of teaching by those in the know. There are other pathways-perhaps more realistic, less expensive and as good-maybe better. Well, let me say, unless you have merited a full scholarship to one of the above institutions, this might be useful for YOU! Even if you have….

Before posting, I have tried to make them affordable, doable, and possible for the serious, well-trained dancer who has professional aspirations and maybe a few flaws (which you of course ARE WORKING ON). They are programs ANY professional dancer would attend (and DO!). I will also try to address the budget worthy, stressing emphasis on technique, performance, classes, and environment-cultural photos are gratis because you will not have very much time anyway, but it is is nice to smell the roses, so to speak, when you do wander.

No one ever talks about what they do at these programs-it is all part of getting your dollar-they all try to keep that a secret, but a lot of the smaller or out-of-the-way programs make very significant attempts at having you WANT to return. They want you to enjoy yourself, relax, and take in the sights. They want to enrich you (makes you and your dancing better!) as well as help your dancing. These are all rather straightforward curriculums and programs with absolutely NO hidden agendas, propaganda, and all of these are well-intentioned programs, revered, and staffed with fine teachers. They do not just take your money! Well, they do, but they do it with panache. Many of them are looking for serious dancers and not poorly trained ones, others are willing to coach privately those who might be looking for a little bit more. Some move around….They are all interesting!

Besides, Summer Programs might also be an excellent way to EXPAND even for the most serious of academic dancers and at any rate I have provided those with a more worldly view to ballet……and timely! None of these are mills.

Read More….https://mysylph.com/2013/01/24/the-summer-intensive-ballet-scholarship-quest-2013/

“Once you have tasted f…


“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.”
Leonardo da Vinci

― Leonardo da Vinci